Using Mindset to Drive Success – Michelle Spirit (NACE Associate)


Michelle is an expert on emotional resilience and adviser for Skills for Care and Mind:

Full article here

“Essentially, mindsets are the beliefs we have of ourselves and our abilities. They shape how we approach challenge. Based on over 35 years of work by Stanford University psychologist Dr Carol Dweck and others, the research shows that those with a growth mindset are more motivated in school and achieve better grades and higher test scores. It’s important to know that mindsets are malleable, and something we can change. “

That Festive Feeling

Winter is here and this time of year is often associated with feelings of happiness and joy. But the reality for many is often quite different and can leave them feeling down in the dumps.

From financial pressure to family feuds; there are many reasons why the festive season brings only stress and worry for some. And for others, it may be a case of feeling those winter blues. SAD, or Seasonal Affective Disorder, is a fairly common phenomenon thought to be caused by a lack of exposure to sunlight.

Often it’s a case of being patient and waiting it out, but there are a few things you can do to help get you back on track for some Christmas cheer.


  1. Get outside – even just 15 minutes may be enough to help improve your overall wellbeing through the winter months. If this isn’t possible, try to sit near a window or invest in a SAD lamp or ‘light box’, this is meant to mimic natural sunlight, although their effectiveness is still debated.


  1. Take regular exercise – preferably outside if possible. There are now several studies which suggest that exercise is as effective as drug therapy for the treatment of mood disorders.



  1. Eat a healthy diet – this goes without saying, overall good health and wellbeing is far more achievable if your body is receiving the correct balance of nutrients and energy.


  1. Talking therapies – there are different options available through the NHS if you wish to do this formally. Alternatively, ensure you meet regularly with friends who you can talk about your feelings with and live an active social life or join a local social group in your area. Interacting with others can help to boost mood significantly.



  1. Volunteer – helping others is a sure fire way to boost your move and what better time of year is there to do it than at Christmas! There are many vulnerable groups of people who require support; including the homeless and those living in poverty. Volunteering at a food bank or even just donating a few spare tins could really help make a difference to someone’s Christmas this year.

*To reference/cite this blog as follows: The MICE Hub, Friday 22nd December 2017, That Festive Feeling.*

*Please note: All opinions expressed are that solely of the MICE Hub and its associates*

Safeguarding, Signs of Safety and ‘Safety First’- the Dutch and English contexts

On the 7th of Dec, Wendy Sims-Schouten gave a talk (a ‘masterclass’) at the Verwey-Jonker institute in Utrecht, the Netherlands on child protection and safeguarding in the Dutch and English contexts. The Verwey-Jonker institute is a research centre for social sciences research and impact.

The talk was based on research undertaken by Kayleigh Rivett (research assistant at the University of Portsmouth) and Wendy Sims-Schouten (associate professor) with a focus on risk driven care in cases of child abuse and domestic violence.

Comparing key documents used in the Netherlands (namely ‘Working together first for safety’, by  Vogtlander and Van Arum, 2016) and England (the NSPCC, 2013 document on ‘Signs of Safety‘) and data from interviews with 17 Dutch and English safeguarding practitioners and professionals.

The research has highlighted some key differences in practical applications in the Netherlands and England. In England, stronger reference is made to involvement of the education system in safeguarding and related multi-agency collaborations, whilst in the Netherlands more links are made with the prosecution system and the police here.

In both countries the importance of muli-agency teamwork is highlighted and flagged up, but there are also signs of ongoing problems in this area – in part due to ongoing cuts in funding and a patchwork of practice. Both countries show similar objectives in relation to developing good working care and individualised support that is inclusive and benefits the family as a whole.

Yet, whilst the Dutch approach is ‘head-on’, with clear procedures in order to ‘listen to families’, the English approach makes reference to ‘protocols’ and the ‘voice of the child’, which is not as clearly defined as the Dutch approach. In both countries though, there is a sense that more can be done to support the most vulnerable people. The talk was attended by academics, as well as social workers and developmental psychologists.

Dr. Wendy Sims-Schouten is project lead for the MICE Hub and Kayleigh Rivett is contributor and author of content for The MICE Hub at The University of Portsmouth School of Education and Childhood Studies.

*To reference/cite this article as follows: The MICE Hub, Tuesday 11th December 2017, Safeguarding, Signs of Safety and ‘Safety First’- the Dutch and English contexts.*