Mental Health Awareness Week 2019 – Body Image

University of Portsmouth alumni discuss issues around body image and provide tips for managing the impact this may have on your mental health:

TIPS FOR BODY IMAGE AND MENTAL HEALTH:

  • Show yourself some gratitude: Instead of judging your body for how it looks, think about everything it allows you to do. This is just as true with your mental health. Instead of judging yourself what you haven’t done, remember everything you have achieved.
  • Be kind to yourself: You may have heard the phrase ‘It’s okay to not be okay’ and reminding yourself of that is just as important as other people knowing. Show yourself the compassion you would show to others, take the time out you need and don’t judge yourself for needing it or for feeling a particular way. It often helps to think of what you would say to someone else if they felt like this.
  • Talk: Though it may seem like a simple and obvious idea, when you’re struggling with your mental health talking to others about it can feel impossible. However when you can get past the feelings of shame and fear of how others will react, this can be such a beneficial tool. Talking about how you’re feeling and struggling can lift a weight off yourself, as well as being a first step to getting the support you need.
  • Prioritise your mental health: If you had a broken arm, your first stop would be a doctor or the hospital. You and your mental health deserve just as much care.

To view the full article originally posted by the University of Portsmouth Alumni Association click here.

With thanks to Hannah Morton and Rebecca Hill – University of Portsmouth alumni, mental health campaigners and bloggers.

Mental health in schools

Earlier this year, researchers based at the Evidence Based Practice Unit (EBPU) at UCL , a unit dedicated to mental health research and innovation in childhood/youth, published an article focusing on the prevalence of mental health problems in schools (Deighton et al., 2019).  

Background and aims for the research – why was it needed?

Policy and research are increasingly focussed on the early identification and prevention of mental health problems in children and young people, based on earlier reported that 1 in 10 experience problems. However, recent evidence suggests that estimates might be higher, and vary according to population.  

The study aimed to explore the prevalence rates of mental health problems of adolescents in schools, as well as the characteristics which influence the odds of adolescents experiencing such problems.

How was the research conducted?

Online surveys were completed by children in Years 7 and 9, during a teacher-facilitated session, and following consent. Ninety-seven English secondary schools who were involved in the HeadStart programme were selected to take part, covering six geographical regions. The final sample consisted of 28,160 adolescents, with the majority (51.2%) of participants aged between 11-12 years in Year 7.

What kind of measures were used?

To assess self-reported mental health difficulties, researchers used the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Four categories of problems are assessed within the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire – emotional, conduct, peer-relationship, and hyperactivity/inattention. Demographic ‘risk’ factors were also explored and this included: Special Educational Needs status, Free School Meal eligibility, Child in Need status, and ethnicity.

What did the researchers find?

Results indicated that 40% (42.5%) of schools reported an elevated risk of adolescents experiencing problems with emotional symptoms, conduct, and inattention/hyperactivity. Those in the ‘high risk’ groups were divided as follows: emotional symptoms (18.4%), conduct problems (18.5%), inattention/hyperactivity (25.3%), and peer-relationship problems (7.3%). Risk factors that increased the odds of adolescents experiencing mental health problems included deprivation (FSM), Child in Need status, gender, ethnicity, and age.

What did the researchers conclude?

Two in five young people were experiencing difficulty in the majority of mental health problem areas assessed (emotional, conduct, and hyperactivity). Risk factors included gender, deprivation (Free School Meals), Child in Need status, ethnicity and age.

However, the researchers cautioned that the increased rates reported could be due to greater recognition/reporting, and/or measurement issues (e.g., self-report may have resulted in higher estimates than a diagnostic tool would report).

The full article can be viewed here.

Blog post written by Dr Rachel Moss (Twitter: @DrRMoss), Research Associate on the PGR Wellbeing project at the University of Portsmouth (School of Education and Sociology).

Mental Health and the NHS Long Term Plan

In January 2019, the NHS published their Long Term Plan – a plan which outlines how the service will develop over the next 10 years. The plan is a published response to changing needs – with a population that is increasing in size, as well as in age, and some significant challenges that will also need to be addressed (e.g., funding, staffing, inequalities). The plan outlines seven chapters which aim to address such challenges, and includes the development of a new service model, further funding (e.g., to upgrade technology), and tackling workforce pressures, amongst others. Chapter 3 outlines how care quality and outcomes can improve, and includes further support for child and young people’s mental health services, and adult mental health services – of relevance to the Mental Health in Childhood and Education Hub.

 

 

 

 

 

Mental health services for children and young people

Funding

  • Over the next five years, access to mental health services in the community will expand, so that an additional 345,000 children and young people between the ages of 0-25 will be supported (e.g., via Mental Health Support Teams based in schools or colleges)
  • Eating disorder services will receive additional investment – this will enable services to maintain the treatment standard (e.g., urgent cases receive treatment within one week, and four weeks for non-urgent cases).

Access

  • Age-appropriate crisis services will be expanded, and a single point of access through NHS 111 will be explored.
  • Support for mental health will be available within schools and colleges – providing additional capacity for early intervention.
  • The transition to adulthood for young people aged between 18 and 25 will be supported – this may involve extending service models to offer support for those aged 0 – 25 years, and integrating a number of sectors (e.g., social care, education).

 

 

 

 

Mental Health services for adults

Common disorders

  • Access to Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services will be expanded – focusing on adults and older adults with a long term condition.
  • Standards for patients requiring community mental health treatment will be delivered across in NHS in the next 10 years.

Emergency support

  • Mental health crisis services will be expanded – a 24/7 community-based response will be available in England by 2020/21 (for adults and older adults). Alternative forms of support will also be explored (e.g., safe havens).
  • A single point of access via NHS 111 will be developed.
  • Waiting time targets will take effect from 2020 for access to emergency mental health services.
  • Ambulance staff will be trained to support individuals in a mental health crisis.

Suicide prevention

  • Suicide prevention and reduction is a priority over the next 10 years – this includes the development of a Mental Health Safety Improvement Programme.

Further information about the Long Term Plan can be viewed here.

Blog post written by Dr Rachel Moss (Twitter: @DrRMoss), Research Associated on the PGR Wellbeing project at the University of Portsmouth (School of Education and Sociology).