Student Minds – Mental Health Support for Students

Student Minds is the UK’s student mental health charity who empower students and members of the university community to develop the knowledge, confidence and skills to look after their own mental health, support others and create change. Student Minds train students and staff in universities across the UK to deliver student-led peer support interventions as well as research-driven campaigns and workshops. By working collaboratively across sectors, they share best practice and ensure that the student voice influences decisions about student mental health.

Starting university can be a wonderful and exciting experience, but it can also bring its own unique challenges. It’s natural to feel nervous or overwhelmed during the first few weeks at university, and it can be a while before you feel like you’ve found your feet. Student Minds works to transform the state of student mental health so that all in Higher Education can thrive, including you!

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It is common to worry about moving to university, and is important to remember that you won’t be the only one feeling this way. Read about other students’ experiences of starting university and what they wish they had known when they started. Find tips for students, written by students on the Student Minds Blog.

Hannah Morton is a University of Portsmouth alumni and is now employed as a Students’ Union Advice Administrator. She was previously featured on The MICE Hub. You can find out more about Hannah’s experience and how she has learned to manage her own mental health issues through our previous post.

Before moving to university, it is helpful to find out what support is available on your campus. At the University of Portsmouth, student support services includes; the Student Wellbeing Service, The Wellbeing Café and the Student Union Advice Centre to help support with adjusting to student life and general wellbeing. For specific support with studying, the University of Portsmouth has ASDAC – Additional Support and Disability Advice Centre.

Prior to your arrival at university make sure you do the following:

  • Disclose any pre-existing mental health difficulties to your university
  • Register for a doctor in your new city
  • Find out about your university counselling services
  • Read our Look After Your Mate guide to find out how you can support your peers
  • Check out our further support page
  • More tips are available here.

 

*With special thanks to Grace Anderson, Fundraising and Communications Manager, Student Minds  and Hannah Morton, Student Adviser Administrator, University of Portsmouth Students’ Union*

 

Please reference this article as follows: The MICE Hub and Anderson, G., 10th November 2017, Student Minds – Mental Health Support for Students. 

 

European Network for Social and Emotional Confidence – Conference on ‘Diversity’, Sweden and Finland June 2017

Perhaps there has never been a more important time to address the complex issues that we all face throughout the world in this time of tremendous change and mass flight of people. ENSEC is devoted to the development and promotion of evidence-based practice in relation to socio-emotional competence and resilience amongst school students in Europe.

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Dr Wendy Sims-Schouten presented two papers at the conference on ‘Diversity’, one on mental health and wellbeing of care leavers and one on childhood obesity and bullying. Here is the link to the relevant PowerPoints and publications.

Professor Håkan Stattin from Örebro University, Sweden, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Sweden provided a keynote on adolescent agency. His message was that research around parenting styles needs to take account of the fact that young people are individuals, with their own personality and temperament, as such parent-child interaction is a two-way street: “Parents respond to youths the same way they do to other people – approach those who are friendly and open and avoid those who are unfriendly and sullen”:

Diversity-Conference-pic-2-June17Professor Peter Smith Emeritus Professor of Psychology, Goldsmiths, University of London, summarised issues around cyber-bullying research and specifically the need for more qualitative research, cross-cultural research and the need for more research with a focus on ethnic minority students.

ENSEC is open to researchers and practitioners working in the area of social and emotional education in Europe. While the main focus of the Network is on what goes in Europe, the network seeks to establish collaboration and dialogue also with individuals and organisations outside of Europe.

For more information and Membership of ENSEC, see website: http://enseceurope.org/?page_id=82:

There are two main entry criteria for membership, namely:

  • the applicant must be a researcher (including PhD students) and/or practitioner working in the area of social and emotional education
  • the applicant must be affiliated to a not-for-profit organisation

Members from European countries are eligible for full membership while those from outside Europe may join as associate members. Membership is free of charge. Members may also register for the network journal, the International Journal of Emotional Education, free of charge.

 

 

 

Mental Health Awareness Event (8th of May) – How can we improve mental health in children & young people?

Increasing numbers of young people experience high levels of anxiety, stress and depression. This can have a massive impact on their health, relationships and future options. The Mental Health Foundation draws attention to the fact that “good mental health is more than the absence of a mental health problem.”

Dr. Wendy Sims-Schouten gives a warm welcome to the morning's keynote speaker - Alison Jeffery and panelists: Sarah Darton, Emma Maynard and Melanie Goddard
Dr. Wendy Sims-Schouten gives a warm welcome to the morning’s keynote speaker – Alison Jeffery and panelists: Sarah Darton, Emma Maynard and Melanie Goddard

Key questions here are – 

  • How many of us are surviving or thriving, and what is the difference between the two?
  • Why are some communities under strain and what can the government do to support them to thrive?
  • What steps can we take to look after our mental health, build resilience and cope with the demands of life?
  • To provide a greater understanding of this highly topical and constantly developing area, the MICE Hub hosted a special event to coincide with Mental Health Awareness Week (8th – 14th of May).
Keynote speaker Alison Jeffery discusses "mental health as everyone's business: emotional wellbeing in education, safeguarding and city wide children's services
Keynote speaker Alison Jeffery discusses “mental health as everyone’s business: emotional wellbeing in education, safeguarding and city wide children’s services

The event took place on Monday 8th May from 10.30am to 3pm in the University’s St George’s Building, 141 High Street, Portsmouth. Keynote speakers were Alison Jeffery, Director of Children’s Services at Portsmouth City Council,  who talked about ‘Mental health as everyone’s business: emotional well-being in education, safeguarding and city wide children’s services’ and Dr David Harper from the University of East London who looked at ‘Rethinking Approaches to Mental Health Stigma’.

In addition to this there were contributions from national charities, such as Family Links, Wessex Academic Health Science Network and academics and research staff from the University of Portsmouth and beyond.

Sarah Darton welcome questions from the audience
Sarah Darton welcomes questions from the audience on the topic of Mental Health, Wellbeing and Families

This was a thought-provoking day, with talks ranging from mental health and wellbeing in early childhood, midwifery, through to mental health in schools and HE and wellbeing of care leavers and mental and social work. In her keynote Alison Jeffery focussed on the MH strategy in Portsmouth and what is being done to support children and young people (and what needs to be done). Melanie Goddard from the Roberts Centre (child focused charity in Portsmouth) talked about programmes and support for young care leavers and birth mothers, whilst Sarah Darton from the national charity Family Links focused on emotional health and resilience in children and families in her talk.  The need to see the bigger picture and engage with family stories and narratives was echoed by Emma Maynard in her session on engaging family narratives.

 

MHAE-Gina-Sherwood-introduces-panelists
The University of Portsmouth’s Dr. Gina Sherwood introduces the panel – Sarah Darton, Emma Maynard and Melanie Goddard, and invites questions from the audience.

Dr David Harper, director of clinical psychology programmes at UEL discussed approaches to mental health stigma, highlighting that there is a need to tackle the stereotyping of MH issues that appears to specifically exist amongst young people. Mental Health in HE was also discussed, with Denise Meyer, Head of Welbeing, UoP flagging up the support services that are available in the University, such as the WhatsUp app. Alison Griffiths, programme manager mental health at Wessex Academic Health Science Network flagged up that 20-24 year olds account for the largest number of mental health emergency departments attendances, 8% of which are University students; Clare Wilson from the University of Portsmouth discussed the need for mental health support groups and the research that she has done around in.

Dr. Wendy Sims-Schouten thanks the keynote speakers and panelists for their time and effort preparing such informative content for the event.

 

Taken as a whole, there was lots of evidence of good practice, but the need for more work on this front was also consistently highlighted.