Hidden Bellies: The Power of Silence and Invisibility in Managing Pregnancies in Mozambique

30th November 2016, 1:00 – 2:30pm

Dr Francesca Salvi, Lecturer, School of Education and Childhood Studies

Abstract:

Decree 39/GM/2003, the first national policy to deal with in-school pregnancy in Mozambique, indicates that girls that get pregnant while being registered at school should transfer to night courses. In this seminar Francesca explained why transfer tends to precede dropout, but also discussed the various strategies that girls implemented in order to resist transfer and remain in their day courses. By hiding their bellies, young pregnant women resist current norms and engage in an act of self-assertion. This goes against mainstream theorisations of silence and invisibility, which point to submission and powerlessness.

The School of Education and Childhood Studies hosts regular seminars with a research focus and presentations from internal and external speakers – here is the link to the seminars for 2016/17

Seminar: 18 November 2015 – Implementing the Pyramid Socio-Emotional Intervention in Schools: Bridging Research to Practice

Speaker: Michelle Jayman and Bronach Hughes, University of West London, Department of Psychology

How it helps

pyramidbookletcoverDeveloped in the 1970s in the UK, Pyramid clubs for children offer a therapeutic group-work early intervention for children aged 7-14.

Normally run as a targeted after-school club in order to minimise stigma and make it accessible to the widest number of children, the clubs run for 10 weeks for 1.5 hours a week, offering a developmental journey for those children who internalise their difficulties and are showing early signs of mental health problems such as social withdrawal, somatic disorders, depression and anxiety.

Theoretical basis

Pyramid clubs have been developed using concepts from two key psychological models: cognitive psychology and positive psychology. The clubs offer children and young people an experiential model of learning about and developing strategies for managing their thoughts and feelings in a supportive environment.

Research by Schiffer on the needs of latency-age children and by Kolvin on the value of short-term therapeutic groups for children at risk, both in the 1970’s, led to the development of the Pyramid model initially.

Pyramid adopts early-intervention principles, working with children at the early signs of problems developing, rather than waiting for full-blown mental health difficulties to develop.

Download Pyramid Presentation (pdf)

Seminar: 14 October 2015 – Evaluating School-Based Mental Health Literacy Programmes

Speaker: Dr Paul Gorczynski

School-based mental health literacy programmes aim to help children understand mental health problems, address stigmatizing attitudes, and access mental health resources. Although school-based programmes have been promoted as optimal ways of improving mental health literacy, their overall effectiveness in primary and secondary schools have not been evaluated thoroughly.

The purpose of this review was to examine the effectiveness of primary and secondary level school-based mental health literacy programmes on mental health knowledge, attitudes, and help seeking behaviour in children under the age of 18 years. In total, 47 studies were included in this review and most showed a positive intervention effect on all three aspects of mental health literacy.

The majority of studies evaluated mental health literacy programmes in secondary schools, focused on promoting knowledge and attitudes on mental illness in general, and involved more female than male students. Programmes varied in structure, length, delivery, and student interaction as well methods of evaluation.

Given programme and methodological heterogeneity, results should be treated cautiously and it is not possible to determine which mental health programme was most effective at addressing mental health knowledge, attitudes, or help seeking behaviour. Suggestions for future school-based mental health literacy programme research and practice are discussed.