Student Minds – Mental Health Support for Students

Student Minds is the UK’s student mental health charity who empower students and members of the university community to develop the knowledge, confidence and skills to look after their own mental health, support others and create change. Student Minds train students and staff in universities across the UK to deliver student-led peer support interventions as well as research-driven campaigns and workshops. By working collaboratively across sectors, they share best practice and ensure that the student voice influences decisions about student mental health.

Starting university can be a wonderful and exciting experience, but it can also bring its own unique challenges. It’s natural to feel nervous or overwhelmed during the first few weeks at university, and it can be a while before you feel like you’ve found your feet. Student Minds works to transform the state of student mental health so that all in Higher Education can thrive, including you!

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It is common to worry about moving to university, and is important to remember that you won’t be the only one feeling this way. Read about other students’ experiences of starting university and what they wish they had known when they started. Find tips for students, written by students on the Student Minds Blog.

Hannah Morton is a University of Portsmouth alumni and is now employed as a Students’ Union Advice Administrator. She was previously featured on The MICE Hub. You can find out more about Hannah’s experience and how she has learned to manage her own mental health issues through our previous post.

Before moving to university, it is helpful to find out what support is available on your campus. At the University of Portsmouth, student support services includes; the Student Wellbeing Service, The Wellbeing Café and the Student Union Advice Centre to help support with adjusting to student life and general wellbeing. For specific support with studying, the University of Portsmouth has ASDAC – Additional Support and Disability Advice Centre.

Prior to your arrival at university make sure you do the following:

  • Disclose any pre-existing mental health difficulties to your university
  • Register for a doctor in your new city
  • Find out about your university counselling services
  • Read our Look After Your Mate guide to find out how you can support your peers
  • Check out our further support page
  • More tips are available here.

 

*With special thanks to Grace Anderson, Fundraising and Communications Manager, Student Minds  and Hannah Morton, Student Adviser Administrator, University of Portsmouth Students’ Union*

 

Please reference this article as follows: The MICE Hub and Anderson, G., 10th November 2017, Student Minds – Mental Health Support for Students. 

 

World Mental Health Day

Tuesday 10th October is world mental health day. This year’s theme is mental health in the workplace, so you may be wondering, how does this impact childhood and education? It is important to remember that educational organisations including schools, colleges and universities are also workplaces for many adults and that their mental health is just as important as our children’s as while children are under their care, they will have a huge influence on their development.

good-idea-blackboardIt is also important to remember that educational organisations are how we prepare our children and young people for the work place. We expect them to enter the world of employment fit and healthy, and well prepared to embark and be successful in their future careers, enabling them to contribute to society and achieve a good state of wellbeing. To enable them to meet these expectations, they must first receive the appropriate support and guidance, to ensure healthy development.

Teachers, pastoral workers and support staff are all a huge part of our children’s and young people’s lives and it is just as important that their mental health and wellbeing is in good shape so that they can provide the very best education and lifelong learning. With nearly half of teachers struggling with mental health, as noted in the Times Educational supplement, it is important to acknowledge that this group of people need help and support too!

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With evidence suggesting that mental health issues in both children, especially girls, and staff are on the rise, it is more important than ever to increase awareness, reduce stigma and provide appropriate support. Issues such as bullying have lasting impact on children’s mental health as does increasing pressure to do well and exam stress. This is also a factor for school staff, especially teachers who have to cope with the ever increasing demands of the profession, including pressures regarding workload, attainment and performance.

To address this, it is important to ensure that our children are aware of what mental health is and to promote good wellbeing. We must show them how to ensure they have the best possible physical and mental health and wellbeing, opening them up to as many opportunities in life as possible. Educational establishments are an ideal place to do this. They provide a good range of experts and a safe and secure setting in which to practice and develop these skills. Developing coping strategies for managing everyday life are important to teach our young people to develop resilience and increase their understanding, so they feel safe to reach out and seek support should they need it.

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It is also essential that educational settings receive the funding and training required by the government to enable them to provide the necessary support to both their staff and pupils. Staff should feel equally safe and supported to seek help for their mental health should they require it. Training should be readily provided to enable staff to provide the appropriate support to students and know when and where to signpost if necessary. Being able to recognise and identify the signs is just as important as being able to treat them.

Several charities are holding campaigns in schools this world mental health day in recognition of the importance of improving our young people’s lives. Young Minds are holding their national #helloyellow campaign. Schools are encouraged to participate to raise awareness of the increasing prevalence of depression in young people, with three children in every classroom being diagnosed with depression. Time to change continue their tireless campaign to address the stigma surrounding mental health, which is particularly prevalent amongst young people, especially boys and young men. Action mental health are promoting their ‘wear purple to school’ on World mental health day as well as their ‘five ways to well-being’ challenge which includes sponsored walks, encouraging donations, and promoting learning about mental health by providing information and resources.

*See our Twitter Feed @MICE_Hub for more links to information surrounding children’s and teacher’s mental health and wellbeing.*

A Service Users Experience of Mental Ill-health in Childhood and Education

This week is focusing on the service user’s experience. Hannah is a University of Portsmouth graduate and is employed as an administrator at the University of Portsmouth’s Student’s Union. She is also a Time to Change Ambassador. Hannah first began to experience mental health issues during her teenage years. In this blog post Hannah describes her experience as a young person in education experiencing mental ill-health.
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*Girl featured in image is not the author of the blog-post*

My name is Hannah, I’m 26 years old and I’ve struggled with anxiety and depression since I was about 14 years old. My depression can result in me not wanting to face the real world, not having the energy to get out of bed or get dressed, feeling worthless, not wanting to see people, feeling inconsolable and so low I just start crying at the slightest thing or so numb I feel nothing – I can never decide which is worse, and that’s just to name a few symptoms. My anxiety can be equally debilitating. Self-doubt and criticisms going round and round in my head making me physically freeze or panic. It can turn me into a quiet, nervous, frantic individual and even make me physically ill. I can naturally be an over thinker and when anxiety takes over this means I constantly second guess myself when I pride myself on the fact that when I make a decision, I MAKE a decision!

Depression and anxiety are not always exclusive. Yes they can affect me at the same time and one can lead to another but this isn’t always the case. They come and go, they can be stronger at times than others, I am not in a constant state of depression and/or anxiety.  I can go for months at a time not feeling depressed or anxious, or not such that it affects my life or having any major symptoms. I have had times where I’ve had a long stretch of nothing big and then one or both kick in and I have to deal with it, to have friends say ‘oh but you were doing so well’. It can just hit like a tidal wave. In retrospect there are generally things that have triggered this but they aren’t always obvious at the time or controllable. Other times they just slowly creep up on me until it becomes overwhelming. Usually my mind has been pre-occupied and self-care has taken a back seat but it can still surprise me

All of this is a brief snap shot into what can happen when I experience depression and anxiety, however that being said this doesn’t mean that I want or need sympathy and I don’t expect you to understand, I just need acceptance. This is something I have that I have to be aware of and deal with from time to time, like someone with diabetes watching their diet and taking injections or an asthmatic with breathing exercises or an inhaler. It doesn’t define me, it is just a small part of me.

I’ve also managed to turn my experiences on their head and thrive from them! Over the last year or so I’ve discovered a passion for mental health advocacy, volunteering, campaigning and supporting others. Through this I have been able to take my negative experiences and turn them into something positive. Now it’s not all hunky dory, I do have my bad days where my depression and anxiety make it hard to get through the day. However my workplace are extremely supportive and they have helped me put a Wellness Action Plan together, to help when I’m struggling. I also thrive by doing the following:

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  • Doing activities I enjoy like dancing, reading, listening to music, being creative, spending time with friends, visiting new places and discovering new things
  • Focussing on the positives, I’ve recently started a GLAD (Grateful, Learned, Achieved, Delighted) diary which I write in ever day
  • Practicing mindfulness
  • Look after myself – good diet, exercise etc.
  • Writing my blog

Instead of letting my mental health be a negative thing, I’m doing everything I can to change my experiences into a positive thing, learn from them and hopefully in the process help and inspire others. Having said all this though, as a friend of mine recently said, sometimes when living with a mental illness surviving is thriving

*You can follow Hannah on Twitter here.* Links are NOT affiliates.*

To cite this post: MICE Hub and Morton, H. 9th August 2017, A Service User’s Experience of Mental Ill-Health in Childhood and Education.