World Mental Health Day

Tuesday 10th October is world mental health day. This year’s theme is mental health in the workplace, so you may be wondering, how does this impact childhood and education? It is important to remember that educational organisations including schools, colleges and universities are also workplaces for many adults and that their mental health is just as important as our children’s as while children are under their care, they will have a huge influence on their development.

good-idea-blackboardIt is also important to remember that educational organisations are how we prepare our children and young people for the work place. We expect them to enter the world of employment fit and healthy, and well prepared to embark and be successful in their future careers, enabling them to contribute to society and achieve a good state of wellbeing. To enable them to meet these expectations, they must first receive the appropriate support and guidance, to ensure healthy development.

Teachers, pastoral workers and support staff are all a huge part of our children’s and young people’s lives and it is just as important that their mental health and wellbeing is in good shape so that they can provide the very best education and lifelong learning. With nearly half of teachers struggling with mental health, as noted in the Times Educational supplement, it is important to acknowledge that this group of people need help and support too!

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With evidence suggesting that mental health issues in both children, especially girls, and staff are on the rise, it is more important than ever to increase awareness, reduce stigma and provide appropriate support. Issues such as bullying have lasting impact on children’s mental health as does increasing pressure to do well and exam stress. This is also a factor for school staff, especially teachers who have to cope with the ever increasing demands of the profession, including pressures regarding workload, attainment and performance.

To address this, it is important to ensure that our children are aware of what mental health is and to promote good wellbeing. We must show them how to ensure they have the best possible physical and mental health and wellbeing, opening them up to as many opportunities in life as possible. Educational establishments are an ideal place to do this. They provide a good range of experts and a safe and secure setting in which to practice and develop these skills. Developing coping strategies for managing everyday life are important to teach our young people to develop resilience and increase their understanding, so they feel safe to reach out and seek support should they need it.

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It is also essential that educational settings receive the funding and training required by the government to enable them to provide the necessary support to both their staff and pupils. Staff should feel equally safe and supported to seek help for their mental health should they require it. Training should be readily provided to enable staff to provide the appropriate support to students and know when and where to signpost if necessary. Being able to recognise and identify the signs is just as important as being able to treat them.

Several charities are holding campaigns in schools this world mental health day in recognition of the importance of improving our young people’s lives. Young Minds are holding their national #helloyellow campaign. Schools are encouraged to participate to raise awareness of the increasing prevalence of depression in young people, with three children in every classroom being diagnosed with depression. Time to change continue their tireless campaign to address the stigma surrounding mental health, which is particularly prevalent amongst young people, especially boys and young men. Action mental health are promoting their ‘wear purple to school’ on World mental health day as well as their ‘five ways to well-being’ challenge which includes sponsored walks, encouraging donations, and promoting learning about mental health by providing information and resources.

*See our Twitter Feed @MICE_Hub for more links to information surrounding children’s and teacher’s mental health and wellbeing.*

The Future of Education: Learning Throughout The Life-course Conference

This year’s conference was hosted by The School of Education and Childhood studies in collaboration with the Higher Education Forum. The conference was organised by Dr Wendy Sims-Schouten and Dr Jessica Gagnon who led a team of academics and administration staff.  It is the sixth annual conference and this year focused on ‘The Future of Education: Learning throughout the Life-course.’ This year over 120 delegates attended the event and lots of participation took place in the form of questions and comments. The event was organised around 4 themes that are central to the work of the department: Mental Health and Wellbeing in Childhood and Education, Childhood and International Development, Education Perspectives, and Inclusion and Diversity. 

Wendy Sims-Schouten and Stephen Corbett begin the conference
Wendy Sims-Schouten and Stephen Corbett begin the conference

The scene for these themes was set by the two keynote speakers, both professors exploring current themes relating to educational and life-course outcomes for future generations. The first speaker was Professor Nigel Thomas, Professor of Childhood and Youth Research in the School of Social Work, Care and Community at the University of Central Lancashire on ’Human Beings Need Something from One Another when they come to places Like Schools’ Participation, Recognition and Wellbeing and Professor Kalwant Bhopal, Education and Social Justice and Bridge Professorial Research Fellow in the Centre for Research in Race and Education, in the School of Education at The University of Birmingham on BME Academic Flight from UK Higher Education. 

Top: Keynote speaker Professor Nigel Thomas. Bottom: Dr Jessica Gagnon introduces keynote speaker Professor Kalwant Bhopal
Top: Keynote speaker Professor Nigel Thomas.
Bottom: Dr Jessica Gagnon introduces keynote speaker Professor Kalwant Bhopal

The keynote speakers raised a number of important issues which generated a whole host of questions to be addressed through future research and collaboration. In particular, Professor Kalwant Bhopal, University of Birmingham, delivered an array of alarming statistics regarding the disadvantages faced by BME students through her research which is linked to the inequalities still experienced by those from BME backgrounds at all levels. In particular, the discrepancies between the number of, not only BME students, but those from other WP groups, who gain access to Oxbridge and Russell Group Universities and the under-representation of BME academic staff across all HEIs (ECU 2015), (HEFCE 2016), (Bhopal 2016), (Independent Schools Council (2016)).

Professor Nigel Thomas delivered his findings from a current research project working in collaboration with various Australian universities and organisations in partnership to look at the link between wellbeing and participation of students. Findings were generally optimistic, but he raised a key point that although students rated ‘having a say’ as particularly important, they need more than ‘just a voice’. That it is important to them that their voice is ‘heard’ by influential people and taken seriously so that they have real choice and influence. Professor Thomas reported that overall, meaningful participation led to recognition and improved student wellbeing.  He also discussed how this would work within the school context and the feeling of threat faced by teachers when pupils are openly invited to participate in what are traditionally adult conversations, should this strategy be implemented (Bingham 2001).  One of the key take home messages being that, “effective participation has a key payoff in enhanced wellbeing.”

Wendy Sims-Schouten and Sylvia Horton are editors of the SECS department's most recent publication: Rethinking Social Issues in Education for the 21st Century - UK Perspectives on International Concerns
Dr. Wendy Sims-Schouten and Dr Angie Dharmaraj- Savicks discussing the departments most recent publication: Rethinking Social Issues in Education for the 21st Century – UK Perspectives on International Concerns, of which Wendy Sims-Schouten and Sylvia Horton are editors.

The conference also introduced new and ongoing research themes within the department including; Dr Wendy Sims-Schouten’s Mental Health in Childhood and Education Hub, Dr Jessica Gagnon’s multiple projects around the themes of Higher Education Experiences: Equity and Inclusion, Dr Francesca Salvi, Dr Angie Dharmaraj-Savicks and Dr Ann Emerson’s Global Education, Childhoods and Outreach, among others.  Important issues and questions were raised that researchers in the department will be working on during the coming year. The conference provides a fantastic opportunity for staff to showcase their work and to meet and listen to academics and practitioners from other universities, colleges and educational organisations.

Rethinking Social Issues in Education for the 21st Century - UK Perspectives on International Concerns. Editors - Wendy Sims-Schouten and Sylvia Horton
Rethinking Social Issues in Education for the 21st Century – UK Perspectives on International Concerns. Editors – Wendy Sims-Schouten and Sylvia Horton

 

References:

Bhopal, K., Brown, H. and Jackson, J (2016) ‘BME academic flight from UK to overseas higher education: aspects of marginalisation and exclusion.’ British Educational Research Journal. 42, 2: 240-257. DOI: 10.1002/berj.3204

Bingham C (2001) Schools of Recognition: Identity Politics and Classroom Practices. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield.

ECU (2015). Equality in Higher Education: Statistical Report 2015. Part 1: staff. London: ECU.

Funding for higher education in England for 2016-17: HEFCE grant letter from BIS (2016) http://www.hefce.ac.uk/news/newsarchive/2016/Name,107598,en.html

Independent Schools Council (2016) Annual Census Report (2016). Retrieved from: https://www.isc.co.uk/research/annual-census/isc-annual-census-2016/