Today is World Mental Health Day

History of the day

The 10th October each year marks World Mental Health Day, which has been observed since 1992. Each year, the day focusses on a particular issue surrounding mental health. In 2018, the theme for #worldmentalhealthday is Young People and Mental Health in a Changing World. It is hoped that the theme focus will demonstrate the importance of addressing the prevention, early intervention and adjusting the information and services available to support the mental health of young people (CYP; defined as those between 15-24 years old).

Why focus on Young People and Mental Health?

Worldwide, between 10-20% of CYP experience mental health disorders. Of those 10-20% of children, more than half of the disorders start before the age of 14, and up to three quarters by the mid-twenties. Within the UK, current efforts to further support the mental health of CYP are being addressed within a national programme to transform existing mental health services (the Children and Young People’s Improving Access to Psychological Therapies programme). Early intervention and prevention have also received an increased focus within the Green Paper for CYP mental health.

Resources to support your general wellbeing

A number of online resources are available to support your general wellbeing today, and beyond:

What to do in a crisis

If you or someone that you know is experiencing a life-threatening medical or mental health emergency:

  • Call 999 and ask for an ambulance (or ask someone else to call for you)
  • Go to A & E (or ask someone else to take you)

Urgent care, but not life-threatening

  • Call 111 (England)
  • Book an emergency GP appointment

Use the ‘I need urgent help’ tool offered by Mind.

Further information on what to do in a mental health crisis or emergency is provided by the NHS. Help for suicidal thoughts can also be found on the NHS website.

 

Blog post written by Dr Rachel Moss (Twitter: @DrRMoss), Research Associate on the PGR Wellbeing project at the University of Portsmouth (School of Education and Sociology). 

Comments are closed.